Aug 27

The History of BET

Black Entertainment Television (BET), headquartered in Washington, D.C. and currently operates under the VIACOM umbrella.   With more than 90 million homes watching worldwide, it is the well-known station targeting African-American viewers.  It is also a leading provider of black American cultural and entertainment based programming, both of original creations, acquired properties and musical presentations.

After stepping down as a lobbyist for the cable industry, Freeport, Illinois native Robert L. Johnson decided to launch his own cable television network. Johnson would soon acquire a loan for $15,000, and earned a $500,000 investment from media executive John Malone to start the network.[3] The network, which was named Black Entertainment Television, launched on January 25, 1980.[4] Initially broadcasting for two hours a week as a block of programming on Nickelodeon (it would not be until 1983 that BET became a full-fledged channel), the network’s lineup consisted of music videos and reruns of popular black sitcoms.  (from Wikipedia)

BET has gained popularity with its’ vast black audience, but has faced a number of major African Americans critics such as syndicated columnist George Curry, cartoonist and television producer Aaron McGruder, movie director  and producer Spike Lee, and former Syracuse University professor Boyce Watkins. These critics and others denounced BET’s programming, claiming it promoted sexism and anti-intellectualism.

They also argued that showing rap and hip hop-oriented programming along with comedy programs either intentionally or inadvertently promoted anti-black stereotypes. BET founder Richard Johnson and Viacom executives claimed they were providing the programming the market demanded. In 2008 a number of prominent black ministers (“Enough is Enough”) publicly protested BET programming choices outside the network’s headquarters.

Enough is Enough supported a 2008 report “The Rap on Rap” by the Parents Television Council that argued that BET’s rap programming, which they believed contained gratuitous sexual, violent and profane content, was targeting children and teens.

The controversy continued in 2010, when BET co-founder Sheila Johnson said she is “ashamed” of what the network has become. “I don’t watch it. I suggest to my kids that they don’t watch it,” she said. “When we started BET, it was going to be the Ebony magazine on television. We had public affairs programming. We had news.

The criticism has not impacted the growth and acceptance of BET and the various shows and programs they have created.  In 2013, it is reported that 79.82% of households with television receive the BET network.  However, there is no information available as to what percentage of those households chose to get the network, or receive the network as part of a larger cable package.

According to the sales material, “BET provides contemporary entertainment that speaks to young Black adults from an authentic, unapologetic viewpoint of the Black experience. BET connects with its target audience in a way no other media outlet can providing hit music, entertainment and news programming that is reflective of their experiences.  Our outstanding mega-specials keep viewers regularly tuned in for the latest and greatest in Black entertainment.”

Jul 28

Tweets Reacts To Safaree’s “Lifeline” Diss Track



The Internet weighs in on Scaff Beezy’s diss track.

Jul 28

Celebrity Birthdays: Soulja Boy Celebrates!



Mack Maine, Bobby Shmurda and more.

Jul 25

Spelman Severs Ties With Bill Cosby



HBCU suspends professorship after deposition release.

Jul 24

Dark red Rose breaks out on Netflix’s ‘Orange is the New Black': The Solution… – Daily Herald

NEW YORK (AP) ” United states audiences were introduced to Australian actress Ruby Rose on the 3rd season of the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black, ” plus she’s quickly become a breakout celebrity.

Rose plays Stella, an inmate at the women’s prison who hits it off along with Taylor Schilling’s lead character, Piper. The series also stars Laverne Cox, Laura Prepon and Uzo Uduba.

In a recent interview, Rose said she’s trailed by paparazzi, even when she’s in the airport. However , the attention she’s obtained is welcomed because “my main goal is always acting. ”

“I had no opportunities just before, ” she said with a chuckle. “I was finding it really hard to get in the door here. Really hard. I couldn’t get an agent, I could not get a manager, I couldn’t obtain an audition. I couldn’t perform anything, and your hands are a little little bit tied at that point. You have a visa that will says it’s for entertainment in addition to no one that wants to represent you. ”

The 29-year-old is considering possible future tasks, and says there’s a possibility she’ll return for the fourth season of “Orange. ”

The girl talked about her experience on the show within a recent interview with The Associated Press.

Associated Press: The thing that was it like to join the massive cast of “Orange is the New Black”?

Rose: We’ve never been in a situation like that where I’ve gotten to meet so many incredible women that are all so skilled and independent and funny, and it’s a very supernatural situation with that a lot of talented people in one room at once, all getting along. It’s great. It was perfect.

AP: Is there anything about the set that will surprised you?

Increased: There’s a lot of re-purposing…. There’s parts of the particular set where it’s someone’s bunk, but then it’s someone else’s bunk right after four o’clock.

AP: You were a fan of the show just before becoming a cast member. How made it happen feel to join the cast?

Rose: The only one I went like, ‘Oh, what’s going on? ‘ was with Laura Prepon. She acquired the prison outfit, the glasses, the brows and the hair. The girl was (her character) Alex strolling down the corridor. I just went, ‘Hi! You’re really good-looking. ‘ She has just so tall and statuesque.

AP: Is there anyone you didn’t have scenes with this you wish you did?

Rose: I did a lot of scenes along with pretty much everyone. I think Laverne (Cox), maybe, I didn’t get any kind of scenes with (her), but we all hung out a lot, and whenever she was there on the fixed, I would always go and sit down in her room.

AP: You also work as a disk jockey. How do you balance that along with acting?

Rose: I get these weekend opportunities to visit different parts of the world and DJ, so it’s literally the perfect mix. I have a fantastic mixture career. It’s a hobby, but it’s something I’ve done for the last 10 years and so it’s always going to be part of me personally.

AP: How did you start acting?

Increased: I actually went to school for acting when I finished high school and about midway through that first year, I ended up booking MTV (in Australia) and so I proceeded to do television introducing, I had a clothing brand plus created my own radio station…. Used to do all these crazy things and it was almost like they were all sidesteps to obtain me into the door with acting…. I’m definitely where I want to become now and it feels amazing.

___

Follow Alicia Rancilio at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar

___

On-line:

http://www.netflix.com/

Jul 24

Dark red Rose breaks out on Netflix’s ‘Orange is the New Black’ | Enjoyment… – Baraboo News Republic

NEW YORK (AP) ” American audiences were introduced to Australian actress Ruby Rose over the third season of the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black, inch and she’s quickly become a large star.

Rose performs Stella, an inmate at the ladies prison who hits it off with Taylor Schilling’s lead character, Piper. The series also superstars Laverne Cox, Laura Prepon plus Uzo Uduba.

In a recent interview, Rose said she actually is trailed by paparazzi, even when she actually is at the airport. However , the attention she actually is gotten is welcomed because “my main goal is always acting. ”

“I got no opportunities before, ” she said with a laugh. “I had been finding it really hard to get in the door here. Really hard. I couldn’t obtain an agent, I couldn’t get a manager, I couldn’t get an season casting. I couldn’t do anything, and your hands are a little bit tied at that point. You have a visa that says it’s actual for entertainment and you have no one that wants to represent you. ”

The 29-year-old is contemplating possible future projects, and says there’s a possibility she’ll return for the fourth season of “Orange. inch

She talked about the girl experience on the show in a recent interview with The Associated Press.

Associated Press: What was it love to join the huge cast of “Orange is the New Black”?

Rose: I’ve never been in a situation like that where I’ve gotten to meet so many amazing women that are all so talented and self-employed and funny, and it’s a very unnatural situation with that many talented people in one room at one time, all getting along. It’s great. It was perfect.

AP: Is there everything about the set that surprised a person?

Rose: There’s a lot of re-purposing…. There’s parts of the set exactly where it’s someone’s bunk, but then it’s actual someone else’s bunk after four o’clock.

AP: You were keen on the show before becoming a cast member. How did it feel to participate the cast?

Flower: The only one I went like, ‘Oh, what’s going on? ‘ was with Laura Prepon. She had the prison outfit, the glasses, the eyebrows and the hair. She was (her character) Alex walking down the corridor. I just went, ‘Hi! You’re really good-looking. ‘ She’s just therefore tall and statuesque.

AP: Is there anyone you didn’t have scenes with that you wish a person did?

Rose: Used to do a lot of scenes with pretty much everybody. I think Laverne (Cox), maybe, I actually didn’t get any scenes along with (her), but we hung out there a lot, and whenever she had been there on the set, I would constantly go and sit in the girl room.

AP: You also work as a disc jockey. How do you balance that with acting?

Rose: I get these types of weekend opportunities to travel to different parts of the planet and DJ, so it’s literally the perfect mix. I have a fantastic combination career. That is a hobby, but it’s something We have done for the last 10 years and so it certainly is going to be part of me.

AP: How do you start acting?

Flower: I actually went to school for acting when I finished high school and about halfway through that first year, I actually ended up booking MTV (in Australia) and so I proceeded to do television showing, I had a clothing brand plus created my own radio station…. Used to do all these crazy things and it had been almost like they were all sidesteps to obtain me into the door with acting…. I’m definitely where I want to be now and it feels amazing.

___

Adhere to Alicia Rancilio at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar

___

Online:

http://www.netflix.com/

Jul 24

Ruby Rose breaks out on Netflix’s ‘Orange is the New Black’ – STLtoday. com

NY (AP) ” American audiences had been introduced to Australian actress Ruby Rose on the third season from the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black, ” and she’s quickly become a breakout star.

Rose plays Stella, an defendent at the women’s prison who strikes it off with Taylor Schilling’s lead character, Piper. The series also stars Laverne Cox, Laura Prepon and Uzo Uduba.

In a recent interview, Flower said she’s trailed by paparazzi, even when she’s at the airport. However , the attention she’s gotten is made welcome because “my main goal is always performing. ”

“I experienced no opportunities before, ” she said with a laugh. “I has been finding it really hard to get in the doorway here. Really hard. I couldn’t obtain an agent, I couldn’t get a manager, I couldn’t get an audition. I couldn’t do anything, and your hands are a little bit tied when this occurs. You have a visa that says really for entertainment and you have no one that wants to represent you. ”

The 29-year-old is taking into consideration possible future projects, and states there’s a possibility she’ll return for that fourth season of “Orange. ”

She talked about her experience on the show in a recent job interview with The Associated Press.

Associated Press: What was it prefer to join the huge cast associated with “Orange is the New Black”?

Rose: I’ve never experienced a situation like that where I’ve gotten to meet so many amazing women that are all so talented and indie and funny, and it’s a very supernatural situation with that many talented people in one room at one time, all getting along. It’s great. It was perfect.

AP: Is there everything about the set that surprised you?

Rose: There’s a lot of re-purposing…. There’s parts of the set exactly where it’s someone’s bunk, but then really someone else’s bunk after four o’clock.

AP: You were a fan of the show before becoming a cast member. How did it feel to participate the cast?

Flower: The only one I went like, ‘Oh, what’s going on? ‘ was with Laura Prepon. She had the prison outfit, the glasses, the brows and the hair. She was (her character) Alex walking down the hallway. I just went, ‘Hi! You’re really good-looking. ‘ She’s just therefore tall and statuesque.

AP: Is there anyone you did not have scenes with that you wish you did?

Rose: Used to do a lot of scenes with pretty much everyone. I think Laverne (Cox), maybe, I actually didn’t get any scenes along with (her), but we hung away a lot, and whenever she has been there on the set, I would often go and sit in her room.

AP: Additionally you work as a disc jockey. How can you balance that with acting?

Rose: I get these weekend opportunities to travel to different parts of the planet and DJ, so it’s literally the perfect mix. I have a fantastic combination career. From the hobby, but it’s something We have done for the last 10 years and so it’s always going to be part of me.

AP: How did you start performing?

Rose: I actually visited school for acting when I completed high school and about halfway through that first year, I ended up booking MTV (in Australia) and so I proceeded to do television presenting, I had a clothing brand and created my own radio station…. I did all these crazy things and it was almost like they were all sidesteps to get me to the door with acting…. I’m definitely where I want to be now and it feels amazing.

___

Follow Alicia Rancilio at http://www.twitter.com/aliciar

___

Online:

http://www.netflix.com/

Jul 23

Who’s Who at The Sprite Corner



Hip hop players set to hit The Corner.

Jul 22

Anthony Hamilton and Wife Tarshá File for Divorce



The R&B singers were married for 10 years.

Jul 22

Azealia Banks to Action Bronson: “F*cking Fat Slob”

Azalea Banks vs Action Bronson

Azealia Banks jumped on twitter yesterday to weight in on the feud between Ghostface Killah and Action Bronson.


“F*cking fat slob. I would like to see him get f*cked up so badly. ” ~Azealia Banks

Azealia Banks went on to say that she remembers when she first met Action Bronson, he or she insulted her, but now Ghostface pulled his card the Baby Blue lyricist, is quiet as a mouse.


“Remember when Action Bronson had all that mouth in order to insult me but now that Ghostface pulled his card he’s mother. ”

Jul 22

Posts: Will Someone Please Explain Variety to Me? – American Thinker — American Thinker

I’m outdated, and recently it seems that a lot of the proceedings in the world, and most especially America, confuses me. No, I don’t have Alzheimer’s or senile dementia. It just confuses me that so many adults, especially politicians, can’t see matters clearly.

Take the newest huge liberal cause: variety. When I was younger, we had yes action, which meant that minorities who were not as well-qualified as a whitened person for acceptance at a college, to be hired for a job, or to be promoted got all of this due to the color of their skin. Evidently that didn’t work out as well as it should possess, because now we have the major problem of diversity, or the lack thereof.

Central Washington University, who just earned a prestigious award for variety, defines it thus: individual differences (e. g., personality, learning designs, and life experiences) and group/social differences (e. g., race/ethnicity, course, gender, sexual orientation, country of origin, and ability as well as social, political, religious, and other affiliations).

A study I go through said that only about 30% of Many companies have diversity departments. Which could possibly keep track of all of those things? If we like to be truly diverse, what about including physical differences: weight, height, vision, body shape, degree and type of disability, etc .? And what about intellectual differences? Why isn’t anyone screaming about equal rights for all the people who might be included in one of those groups? Shouldn’t Central Washington University include the items listed above in their definition?

Television isn’t totally diverse. There is BET (Black Entertainment Television) and other channels to meet the needs of other groups. However , there isn’t a MOIST (White Entertainment Television) channel. It simply wouldn’t be permitted, since it wouldn’t be inclusive or diverse. Almost all shows seem to have some blacks and at least one LGBT person, whether they fit into the plot or not. That is, of course , with the exception of Empire , where a white person is rarely seen. Maybe gowns part of a reverse diversity strategy, where stations that are not dark or another minority have to have a percentage of their shows for only minorities.

The Academy Awards weren’t diverse enough this year regarding Jesse Jackson. I always thought that the writers, cast, crew, etc . were picked for their ability to do a good job and earn money for the company making the film. I wasn’t conscious until this year that we should have had quotas, or counted the number of individuals of each race who participated in the making of a film. Thanks for that, Jesse. I’ll be sure to count all the people in every film I see from now on to make sure that proper percentages are represented. Maybe the races and nationalities of the producers, directors, cast, plus crew should be listed in the credit to ensure that we are going to see diverse films. Films are rated for assault, language, and sexual content. Probably we should be working on a diversity rating so you would know instantly set up film you were seeing is appropriately diverse. And now, the Emmys not necessarily diverse enough, even though the two females nominated for best actress are both dark.

Then, just when I thought I couldn’t get any more confused, the government threw a big wrench into the whole mess. Jeannie DeAngelis recently wrote an article regarding American Thinker about “The Fundamental Transformation of America’s Neighborhoods. ” Now we’re all going to be forced to be diverse within our living arrangements as well. I wonder how that plan will work in Dearborn, Michigan, which is almost totally Muslim. Will Christians, who are many in this country, be forced to move to Dearborn? Or will the Muslims in Dearborn be forced to move to other cities or communities? Or is religious beliefs not considered in diversity planning?

Colin Flaherty, author of Don’t Associated with Black Kids Angry , recently did a podcast called ” The White People are Coming . ” In it you hear a black woman complaining about some whitened people moving into her previously all of black neighborhood. When that happens, for some reason, it’s called “gentrification, ” not really diversity.

You are unable to force companies, communities, groups, neighborhoods, etc . to be diverse. It just doesn’t work in the real world. Take the AFL/NFL for example. Both groups are primarily black. Why? Because obviously dark players are superior to those of additional races/ethnicities. Franchises want the best players for their teams because the fans want to see winning teams. If inferior players are hired for some arbitrary reason and the team consistently loses, the franchise will probably go out of business. Everyone loses.

Can you want yourself or a loved one looked after by a nurse who gained entry to college over more qualified individuals and who was pushed through to fulfill some diversity quota? How about getting your money handled by someone who was hired so the company could be more diverse but wasn’t nearly as qualified as the person who wasn’t hired? If your house is burning, do you want the very best firefighters or the ones who were hired so there was more diversity? I actually bet you would want the best, even when they’re all purple.

It’s the same for where people choose to live. They look for an area that meets their requirements and their budget. I live in a small house in a location of my choosing because it meets my needs and I can afford it. I have buddies who have very large houses in rich neighborhoods. They worked hard to obtain what they did. Why should someone who did not feel “entitled” to live in the same type of house in the same neighborhood? The only way that can happen is if the federal government subsidizes most of the cost.

What happens to the people who do not get what they want because something is diverse sufficient already? Maybe diversity should be extended to make sure minorities are diverse, so those less qualified have the same opportunities as those who have qualifications?

Diversity, from the things i can see happening now, won’t create us a better, stronger country. It can push more people into wanting to get something for nothing. When that happens, why should anybody try to achieve anything? Individuals should achieve on their own merits, not really on some arbitrary plan.

So I continue to be baffled. If anyone can help clarify this whole mess for me, especially why it is necessary, leave a comment.

Claire Hawks is a gray-haired granny and upon the market from both her nursing and yes it careers.

I’m old, and recently it seems that a lot of what is going on in the world, and many especially America, confuses me. No, I don’t have Alzheimer’s or senile dementia. It just confuses me that so many adults, especially political figures, can’t see things clearly.

Take the newest large liberal cause: diversity. When I was younger, we had affirmative action, which meant that minorities who were less well-qualified as a white person regarding acceptance at a college, to be hired for a job, or to be promoted got all of this because of the color of their skin. Evidently that didn’t work out as well as it should have, because now we have the major problem of diversity, or the lack thereof.

Central Washington University, who just won a prestigious award regarding diversity, defines it thus: individual differences (e. g., personality, studying styles, and life experiences) plus group/social differences (e. g., race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, nation of origin, and ability as well as cultural, political, religious, and other affiliations).

A study I actually read said that only about 30% of America’s companies have diversity sections. Who could possibly keep track of all of those matters? If we want to be truly diverse, how about including physical differences: weight, elevation, vision, body shape, degree and type of disability, etc .? And what about intellectual differences? Why isn’t anyone shouting about equal rights for all the folks who could be included in one of those groups? Should not Central Washington University include the products enumerated above in their definition?

Television isn’t totally diverse. There is BET (Black Entertainment Television) and other channels to meet the requirements of other groups. However , there isn’t any WET (White Entertainment Television) station. It simply wouldn’t be allowed, because it wouldn’t be inclusive or even diverse. Almost all shows seem to have some blacks and at least one LGBT person, whether they fit into the story or not. That is, of course , with the exception of Empire , where a whitened person is rarely seen. Probably that’s part of a reverse variety plan, where stations that are not really black or another minority have to have a portion of their shows for only minorities.

The Academy Awards weren’t diverse enough this season for Jesse Jackson. I always thought that the writers, cast, crew, etc . were picked for their ability to perform a good job and earn money for the organization producing the film. I was not aware until this year that we must have had quotas, or counted the number of people of each race who participated in the making of a film. Nice that, Jesse. I’ll be sure to rely all the people in every film I see from now on to make sure that proper percentages are usually represented. Maybe the races plus ethnicities of the producers, directors, forged, and crew should be listed in the credits to ensure that we are going to see diverse films. Films are rated regarding violence, language, and sexual content material. Maybe we should be working on a variety score so you would know instantly whether or not the film you were seeing is usually appropriately diverse. And now, the Emmys aren’t diverse enough, even though the two women nominated for best actress are both black.

After that, just when I thought I didn’t want to get any more confused, the government threw a big wrench into the whole clutter. Jeannie DeAngelis recently wrote an article for American Thinker about “The Fundamental Transformation of America’s Neighborhoods. ” Right now we’re all going to be forced to be diverse in our living arrangements as well. I actually wonder how that plan works in Dearborn, Michigan, which is almost totally Muslim. Will Christians, that are a majority in this country, be forced to proceed to Dearborn? Or will the Muslims in Dearborn be forced to move to additional cities or communities? Or is usually religion not considered in diversity planning?

Colin Flaherty, author of Shouldn’t Make the Black Kids Angry , recently did a podcast called ” The White Individuals are Coming . ” In it you hear a black woman complaining about several white people moving into her previously all black neighborhood. When that happens, for some reason, it’s called “gentrification, ” not diversity.

You cannot force companies, communities, groups, neighborhoods, etc . to be diverse. It just doesn’t work in the real world. Take the AFL/NFL for example. Both groups are usually primarily black. Why? Because certainly black players are superior to those of other races/ethnicities. Franchises want the very best players for their teams because the followers want to see winning teams. If second-rate players are hired for some irrelavent reason and the team consistently loses, the franchise will probably go out of company. Everybody loses.

Would you want yourself or a beloved cared for by a nurse who obtained entrance to college over more qualified people and who was pushed to meet some diversity quota? How about having your money handled by somebody who was hired so the company might be more diverse but wasn’t nearly because qualified as the person who wasn’t hired? If your house is burning, do you want the best firefighters or the ones who have been hired so there was more variety? I bet you would want the very best, even if they’re all purple.

It’s the same regarding where people choose to live. They look for an area that meets their needs and their budget. I actually live in a small house in a location of my choosing because it satisfies my needs and I can afford it. I use friends who have very large houses in affluent neighborhoods. They worked hard to achieve what they did. Why should somebody who didn’t feel “entitled” to live in the same type of house in the same neighborhood? The only way that can happen is if the government subsidizes most of the cost.

What happens to the folks who don’t get what they want because something is diverse enough already? Maybe diversity must be expanded to make sure minorities are diverse, so those less qualified possess the same opportunities as those who have qualifications?

Diversity, through what I can see happening now, refuse to make us a better, stronger nation. It will push more people straight into wanting to get something for nothing. When that happens, why should anybody try to achieve anything at all? People should achieve on their own worth, not on some arbitrary strategy.

So I continue being confused. If anyone can help clarify this whole mess for me, especially why it is necessary, leave a comment.

Claire Hawks is a gray-haired granny plus retired from both her medical and IT careers.

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